Category Archives: Recycling

RECYCLING THINGS THAT RUN

…on energy, that is. Are your drawers stuffed with old batteries and cell phones you Internet_icon_6(rightly) don’t want to toss in the trash? Is your closet space jumbled with outdated computer monitors and printers? Is that old refrigerator in the basement worth the hefty watts it racks up on your monthly electric bill? Probably not, but who wants to haul it up the steps?

Solutions abound for recycling unwanted, energy-consuming devices. Check out local sources online by typing in key words on Internet search engines, and soon you’ll be freeing up space in your home, doing the environment a favor, helping out someone in need and maybe even earning a few bucks.

Refrigerators: Some utility companies and other organizations will pick up old refrigerators in working condition and even pay you for them, anywhere from $35 to $50. The refrigerators must be empty and clean, plugged in and running the day they are picked up, which is scheduled in advance.

Computers and Electronics: Did you know full-service Best Buy stores will accept many working and nonworking items for free recycling and disposal, regardless of where they were purchased? Certain restrictions apply, but no appointment is necessary. You can drop off items any time during regular business hours.

C-PAP Machines: Machines used to restore adequate oxygen intake to those who suffer from sleep apnea can save lives. If you upgrade to a newer device, the old one can be recycled and distributed to a patient who might not otherwise be able to afford it.

Cell Phones: Corporate stores of both Verizon and Sprint will refurbish used cell phones, chargers and headsets regardless of make, model or service provider, and donate them to victims of domestic violence. Drop off items anytime during regular business hours. Nonworking cell phones are properly recycled and disposed of.

Batteries: Some Batteries Plus stores will recycle batteries from laptops, cell phones, cameras, watches, even motorcycles and cars, as well as your everyday rechargeable and single-use lithium batteries. They don’t take alkaline batteries.